InRhythm 2016 Year in Review

Happy New Year from InRhythm! This year, have had the privilege of working with truly amazing clients, serving as their trusted partner in implementing modern digital transformations. We have made inroads into new markets, expanded our geographic influence, and were fortunate enough to collaborate on many incredibly exciting projects. Our continued growth and success have ...

Empire Node 2016

This article was originally posted by Jack on his blog.   Last month I had the good fortune to attend Empire Node at The National Museum of the American Indian, courtesy of InRhythm. A good time was had by all and we got to see some great talks! There was programmable music, smart ways to get ...

Setting up angular2-universal on your node server

This article was originally posted by Vitaliy on his blog.   As of writing the latest version is 2.1.0-RC.1, which introduced ahead of time compilation (AoT) support. What is angular2-universal? First, a bit of history regarding AngularJS. Version 1 of angular was very tightly coupled with the DOM. That means that any application you write has ...

The Key to Product Management? User Experience

07. December 2016 InRhythm 0
Product Managers (PdMs) are the advocates for the business and for the end-user of a Product, and in this sense, they not only own the vision and requirements for the product, but also the user experience. In a small startup with limited resources, the Product Manager role can potentially be executed by a single individual. ...

Code Challenge Accepted (And Answered)

Code Challenge Accepted (And Answered)
One of engineers challenged our entire team with the following task:   Code challenge (in js, obvi). Write a one-liner that outputs (int) 10 using only the following symbols: “+”, “[” and “]” Oh, and you have to explain your answer. Extra credit: Same restrictions, output (string) 20. Now if you want to play around ...

The Current State of {{Angular.SEO}}

The Current State of {{Angular.SEO}}
Pretty URLs Angular, by default, is configured to use hashbangs (#!) to denote a new page or state of the site/application. Url’s with a hashbang aren’t technically considered new pages by site crawlers. These type of urls are partials/fragments and are generally bad for SEO. Crawlers don’t index the content of fragments, by design, since ...